SGP: Friendly Feelings Contribution

This week our serious game project team further discussed out game ideas.  After much debate, we decided that we would expand upon Sierra’s idea.  Sierra’s idea involved a game which revolved around the usage of imaginary friends as emotional intelligence learning tools.  As children grow up, we found it important that they have the skills necessary to get through difficult aspects of their lives.  Thusly, creating a game to foster those skills seems rather important considering most of our group members grew up lacking any education in this field.

In order to educate users in emotional and social intelligence, we agreed upon making a game which is, at its core, is a child-friendly visual novel.  The characters in-game, which will be the player’s ‘imaginary friends,’ will be scattered around a park or playground which has very drab, washed-out colors.  The player has to talk to all of the ‘imaginary friends,’ each of which will be representative of a social/emotional intelligence skillset such as self-awareness, self-management, motivation, empathy, social skills, etc.  Conversing with a character will educate the player about the associated social/emotional intelligence skillset, after which the player is brought into a fun puzzle game which they must solve.  The puzzle will reinforce what was just taught to the player in a fun and engaging way, therefore hammering home the message.  After each puzzle is completed, the section of the game environment that the associated game character was located in will have its full color and vibrancy restored, therefore providing players with additional incentive to keep progressing through the game.  After completing the puzzle provided by one in-game character, players can then move on and converse with the other characters.

As for this week’s game brief, I had expanded upon the “Levels/Environment” section as well as the “Main User Mechanics/Actions” section.  For “Levels/Environment,” I discussed our ideas regarding progression and came up with the idea for gradually restoring color to the game world as players progressed.  As for mechanics, we figured that out game would be best suited for mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets as that would provide us with the greatest reach for hitting our target market of 6 to 10 year-olds.

 

Game Brief

Group Members:

Luke Carpentier – https://lukecarpentier.wordpress.com/

Sierra St.Onge – https://sierraphantom.wordpress.com/

Khuong Truong – https://dysfunctionalthinking.wordpress.com/

Darius Watts – https://badcoffeesite.wordpress.com/blog/

Nicolas Kruzel – https://seriousfailure.wordpress.com/blog/

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SGP: Emotional Intelligence Game Idea

This week for Serious Game Project, I was determined to create a game which would aid children in developing skills which would help them to become more aware of their own emotional states, while also helping them to better recognize the emotions of others.

Growing up, I was not lucky enough to educated in emotional intelligence and recognition.  I was an extremely cheery and upbeat kid and had little to no experience dealing with the stresses of the real world as I would never let anything get under my skin.  Upon growing up, however, difficult transitionary periods in my life – such as going to college –  were extremely challenging, ultimately leaving me to figure out the coping skills that I would need as an adult on my own.

As a subsequent result of my own difficulties, I wanted my game idea to be able to at least make children more consciously aware of their emotional states so they don’t have to go into difficult situations with little or no coping skills.  Therefore, I have decided to create an interactive story game which allows for some user input (similar to the Telltale games).  The story will detail a series of events and will allow for players to choose certain responses or actions in each section of the story.  Depending on their selection, different scenarios will unfold each resulting in a different emotional response.  The affected characters will then explain how they feel as a result, why they feel that way, and how they can make the most of that emotional response or to healthily cope with it.  A quick example could be that one character in the story is demeaned or belittled by another character, thus granting the player numerous options to choose from in order try and cheer up that character.  This type of gameplay would not only allow for children to gain a basic understanding of how emotions can tie into their actions but would also allow for them gain some insight on emotional recognition as they’d visibly see characters in game respond to certain scenarios with certain emotional responses.

 

Group Members:

Luke Carpentier – https://lukecarpentier.wordpress.com/

Sierra St.Onge – https://sierraphantom.wordpress.com/

Khuong Truong – https://dysfunctionalthinking.wordpress.com/

Darius Watts – https://badcoffeesite.wordpress.com/blog/

Nicolas Kruzel – https://seriousfailure.wordpress.com/blog/

SGP: Signs of the Tide Contribution

This week our SGP group got together and discussed our three game ideas.  In the end, however, we decided that we were going to flesh out and further develop our turn-based strategy game which utilizes American Sign Language as a method of control input!  The basic idea of “Signs of the Tide” is that it will allow those who utilize American Sign Language or are trying to learn American Sign Language to practice both creating hand signs as well as recognizing them.

This week, I worked on the “Introduction to Game” portion of the game brief.  Although the actual game idea itself is pretty straightforward, the unique control method we created makes for a rather interesting game.  In it, players will be able to use sign language as a method of input via the usage of either a computer webcam or possibly the Nintendo Switch Joycon (which will view and interpret the hand signs formed by players).  Since “Signs of the Tide” is a strategy game, we decided that players will be able to use hand signs as a means of moving their units, as well as for choosing the actions of those units, in-game.  For this to work, we decided that the game will utilize a node-based system with which a player’s units can only be moved to specified nodes on the game map.  Above each node, a word will be listed which, when signed, will move the player’s selected units to that node.  Each level in-game will feature a different topic such as foods, colors, or months; which will be the basis what words will be associated with nodes on the game map.  Between levels, there will be story portions of the game during which in-game characters will sign in ASL directly to the players, after which they must utilize the signs learned during the previous level to respond to the in-game character.

I also worked on the “Unique Game Features” portion of the brief this week, however, our unique feature is the inclusion of the sign language based control input which I already mentioned above.

 

Game brief – link

Luke Carpentier – https://lukecarpentier.wordpress.com/

Sierra St.Onge – https://sierraphantom.wordpress.com/

Khuong Truong – https://dysfunctionalthinking.wordpress.com/

Darius Watts – https://badcoffeesite.wordpress.com/blog/

Nicolas Kruzel –